Bibliographies of Camp-related Research

Bibliographies of Camp-related Research

Personality factors and their relationship to adjustment in a camping situation.
Janus, S.
Unpublished doctoral dissertation, New York University, 1967.

Purpose:
Determine the relationship between personality factors and adjustment to a resident camping situation.

Sample:
Subjects: 94 female college students ages 18-20 enrolled in a college outdoor education curriculum at New Jersey State College.
Camp Affiliation: New Jersey State School of Conservation Camp at Stokes Forest.

Method/Instruments:
Camp Program: activity-oriented one-week resident camp program. Activities were geared toward outdoor living skills, nature and environmental studies and conservation

Instruments:

  • Edwards Personal Preference Scale - measured preferences for order, autonomy, and succorance.
  • Barron's Ego Strength Scale
  • Budner Tolerance of Ambiguity Scale
  • Elias Family Opinion Survey
  • Camp Adjustment Rating Scale and Personal Rating of Camp Scale - developed by the researcher and evaluated by a panel of experts.

Design:
Pre-test on Edwards, Barron's, Budner, and Elias instruments/ in-camp test after four days on the Camp Adjustment Rating Scale and Personal Rating of Camp Scale

Data Analysis:

  • Pearson Product Moment Correlation
  • Eta correlation coefficients and F test of linearity

Results:

  • Researcher concluded that generalized ego strength, flexibility, and openness to new experiences were the primary factors affecting camp adjustment.
  • Significant positive correlation between ego strength and self-rating of adjustment to camp.
  • Significant negative correlation between degree of "homeyness" measure and self-rating of adjustment to camp, indicating that subjects who did not have great dependency on their families were more likely to adjust well to new situations.
  • Significant negative correlation between the students' self-rating of autonomy and adjustment to camp. The researcher concluded that tendency to avoid situations in which one is expected to conform does not lead to positive adjustment to camp. He further concluded that camp may be perceived as impinging on the autonomous individual's independence and personal freedom.
  • No significant relationship between subject's self-rating of tolerance of ambiguity and adjustment to camp.
  • No significant relationship between subject's self-rating of succorance and adjustment to camp.
  • The researcher concluded that peer-ratings and self-ratings measured different dimensions of adjustment (internal and external).

 

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