The Ultimate Marketing Plan

There are tons of different ways to market your camp and all of them seem to require time or money.  In this session we will review data from dozens of private/non-profit camps to determine where exactly you should be focusing your efforts. Using these successful camps as our guide, we’ll pick apart their approach to marketing online and identify a few of the most effective marketing strategies.  Perhaps most importantly, we’ll have this discussion within the context of a marketing plan so you’ll be able to take home a comprehensive framework for use at your camp.  

Ten Photo Posting Tips

Posting daily photos of campers is a service many camps now offer, and many parents have come to expect. If you post photos for camp parents to view, you’ve probably handled complaints from well-meaning parents who spend a lot of time scouring through your camp’s photos, often watching them upload, one by one.

Marketing Essentials for the New Economy

Tough economic times require that you turn up the marketing heat and attract new customers to your doors, while increasing current customer loyalty and repeat business.

Teaching the Skills That Children Need to Succeed

In his book Homesick and Happy, child psychologist Michael Thompson, PhD, describes the dilemma that faces so many of today’s parents. “I have spoken with many parents, who, out of the deepest love for their children, want only to do more — not less — for their children,” says Thompson. “They believe that the more time, energy, attention, and money they can devote to their child, the better” (2012, p. 9).

Parent Study Suggests Strategies for Effective Use of Camp Research

The question is often asked, “So now that we have this research, how can I tell parents about it?” A fair question. Directors and camp administrators require action plans rather than theories and are tight on both time and resources. There is little opportunity to seek out the latest studies and findings, let alone put them into practice. It’s a fact that even with our electronic devices and specific apps, informative and relevant studies still languish in databases little accessed except by graduate students in search of citations.

Welcome to the Digital Cabin: How New Technologies Can Deliver a Better Summer Experience

Technology and camping? Hearing those two words together often sparks ire among camp management. “We don’t allow our kids to use techie toys!” you declare. Of course, unless you run a computer camp, that philosophy holds true. iPhones and tweets (except those of birds) have no place in kids’ lives near the woods, lake, or farm.

But camp owners and staff are discovering that practical technologies and tools can help them fill bunks and buses faster with quality campers, communicate better with staff and parents, and save thousands of dollars and hours each year.

Search Marketing on the Web — Drive New Camper Enrollment and Alternative Businesses

The quiet, final weeks of August find camp directors exhaling and peering out over empty fields — luckier ones are on a beach somewhere preparing meticulously crafted reenrollment letters. Agonizing over price increases to the tenths of a percent, directors know that other than a handful of summer sign-ups, many camps actually have no enrollment for the coming year. That dilemma may be resolved within days for some, but others, especially those serving teens and many nonprofit camps, must start from scratch every fall.

The Basics of Online Reputation Management

“Online reputation management.” Even if you’ve never heard this phrase before, you probably have a good sense of what it means. The first part (“online reputation”) is easier than ever for you or anyone else to find — just search for your camp’s name in Google.

Finding your online reputation is easy due to two main factors:

The 24/7/365 Camp Community: Sitting around the Online Campfire

We live in an era of experiences and community. What does that mean? Camp directors and staff just spent the past months creating memorable experiences for their campers, ensuring that every child felt welcome, engaged, safe, and inspired at camp. Parents were reassured that their children were having fun and were well cared for — and they were entertained during visiting days. Relationships were forged, and memories were made.