Resource Library

Standards: Reviewed, Revised, Reformatted!
Published Date: 2015-10-11

THEY’RE HERE!

What’s This Mean to Me?

  • The 2012 edition of the Accreditation Process Guide (APG) was released mid-September 2011.
  • All fee-paying camps and visitors will receive a complimentary printed version of the 2012 APG. These are distributed at the local level.
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Over the past eighteen months, ACA’s accreditation standards have been reviewed, revised, and reformatted. This process has been a thorough/thoughtful review of one of ACA’s core programs, at the recommendation of the Accreditation and Education Task Force. While the actual content of the majority of the standards has not changed, all of the standards have been reviewed, and many have been reworded to focus on the practice that must be in place in order to meet the standard.

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We will call him, Mr. Joe. An eighty-one-year-old former resident of New Orleans, Mr. Joe tells Canon Walter Friese, interim director of Hardnter Camp and Conference Center in Pollock, Louisiana, about his aching arms as he swam his way to safety through the swirling waters of a devastated city in the midst of a catastrophe that many of us could never imagine. "Mr. Joe was so gracious and kind to those suffering around him.

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Nature Loves Nurture
Published Date: 2003-01-01

In the spring of 2002, Psychologist Wallace Dixon published the results of a survey of 1,500 randomly selected, doctoral-level members of the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD). He had asked the society members which studies, published since 1950, they considered "most revolutionary."In this series, psychologist Christopher Thurber - an ACA member as well as a member of SRCD - shares a summary of the top twenty most revolutionary studies.

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Oliver cried lustily. If he could have known that he was an orphan, left to the tender mercies of churchwardens and overseers, perhaps he would have cried the louder.
— from Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens

Big Questions

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My ears have yet not drunk a hundred words
Of thy tongue's uttering, yet I know the sound.

Juliet, from Romeo and Juliet
— by William Shakespeare

BIG Questions

Children learn language not by rote, but by a seemingly effortless interaction between their sponge-like brains and their language-rich environments. This breathtaking process begins as rapidly as Juliet learned to recognize Romeo's voice.

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I Am. Therefore, I Think
Published Date: 2003-07-01

"Pooh," said Rabbit kindly, "you haven't any brain." "I know," said Pooh humbly.
— from The House at Pooh Corner by A. A. Milne

Big Questions

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Big Questions

If someone told you that you had a "retrospective, unidirectional bias" and had contracted the "availability heuristic," you might think you need to visit a doctor right away. Actually, you'd be right. But you wouldn't need a medical doctor. You'd need a research psychologist — someone with expertise in statistics and child development. Someone who could explain to you that your bias and heuristic — although unhealthy — were common and easily removed. Once cured, you could see more nuances in your campers' behaviors.

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"Dear Mom and Dad, I’m having a great time at camp," writes twelve-year-old Michael. "Today, I rode a horse for the first time. I thought it would be scary, but it was loads of fun. Tonight I’m going to the camp dance and in the morning we’ll be fishing at the lake. The food is good here, too . . . ."

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Pages

E.g., 2020-09-27
E.g., 2020-09-27