Resource Library

Camp health is not bound by the four walls of the health center. Nor is safety bound by a list of rules at any given camp activity. Today’s camp professional realizes that all camp staff contribute to and have responsibility for a camp’s health and safety profile; indeed, the camp experience can be considerably healthier when camp staff act sensibly (American Camp Association, 2011; Garst, Erceg, Baird, & Thompson, 2010; Garst, Erceg, & Walton, in press; Papageorgiou, Marvomatis, & Kasta, 2006). Granted, some staff have direct responsibility to care for campers.

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Why would the University of Denver require that every graduate business student go to camp? What possible good would derive from forcing predominantly urban dwelling professionals to go off in the mountains to work in teams in outdoor activities?

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Sorry, Not Sorry
Published Date: 2019-05-01

We've all been there. We're trying to help or referee some situation with kids, we're told a few things or parts of the story, and we think we know what happened, so we turn to the kid who we think is at fault and utter some variation of the words, "Go say you're sorry."

Let's be honest about one thing: They are not sorry!

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From Peg - July 2010
Published Date:

In today's world, relevance and added value are important to everyone. Being essential in a world that often must eliminate discretionary expenses is of paramount importance. And, the ability to articulate worth is equally imperative.

Over the last three years, the American Camp Association® (ACA) has focused on five outcomes for children and youth as they relate to our mission to enrich the lives of children, youth, and adults through the camp experience.

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Camp: Preparation for Life
Published Date: 2017-09-01

To say that expectations and pressures for high school students have increased is an understatement. The competition to get into the best universities dominates the minds of teenagers and parents alike, with colleges seemingly ever more selective. This shift has put renewed emphasis on augmenting adolescent learning experiences.

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According to some experts, 2012 could be the worst year ever for computer network security breaches. In 2011, major companies were victims of massive computer network security breaches. If you listen to the news surrounding this issue, the impression you might get is that only big, publicly owned companies like SONY and Citibank are being affected.

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Though the summers of my adulthood bear little resemblance to those of my youth, the season retains the alluring aura of possibility that accompanied it throughout those earlier years. Even when summer weather is anything but, even when I find myself engaged in the most un-summerly of activities, the months continue to lend a certain mindset, one where memories of summers past exhort new action. Opportunity knocks — won’t you answer?

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Attracting Diverse Staff and Campers
Published Date: 2011-09-01

I am white, Protestant, and I was raised in an upper-middle class, two-parent household . . . but that does not mean that my campers or staff need to be. As the founder and director of Camp Hawkeye, a coed overnight camp in Moultonborough, New Hampshire, I realize that it actually means more for my campers and staff if they are not. I founded Hawkeye with a diversity focus — to combine groups that are usually reached by disparate camps and bring them together in one program for the shared benefit of everyone involved.

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Positive Discipline
Published Date: 2018-09-01

Camp has changed significantly since my first year as a counselor in 1989. Advancements include: online registration, drones shooting video footage, cool water trampolines and climbing devices, overnight camps with shorter sessions, and day camp programs growing in numbers every summer. But some of the biggest advancements across the industry are not as obvious. Focusing on child development has become the priority for camps that want to have a long-term positive impact on children’s lives.

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Scott Sampson, PhD, is a dinosaur paleontologist, science communicator, and passionate advocate for connecting people with nature. He currently serves as vice president of research and collections and chief curator at the Denver Museum of Nature & Science, where much of his work focuses on rethinking 21st-century cities as places where people and nature thrive. He is perhaps best known as “Dr. Scott,” host and science advisor of the Emmy-nominated PBS KIDS series Dinosaur Train, which airs in more than 100 countries.

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