How to Get Kids to Calm Down

Working closely and networking with other camp professionals is one of the best tools for growing our own camp programs. I am fortunate to have a dear friend, Audrey Monke, who is the owner/director of Gold Arrow Camp in California. Audrey is passionate about sharing her experiences and skills as a camp director beyond the scope of her campers, staff, and camp. Besides running a camp, Audrey’s goal is to be a resource on how to raise healthy and happy kids (and share the many benefits of sending kids to camp).

Practicing and Teaching Mindfulness

Description: 
Mindfulness is the practice of being fully "present," right here, right now. It's the opposite of mind-FULL-ness, or feeling constantly distracted. Camp offers the perfect setting to teach and practice these skills. The benefits include decreased stress, improved problem-solving, and more positive relationships. Learn techniques appropriate for any age and setting.

Learner Outcomes:
By the end of the webinar participant will learn:

The Most Important Question You Can Ask an Alumni Staff Applicant

We love having alumni apply to work for our program. Following their years of participation as campers, we ask them to step away for a year or two before they can reengage as a staff member. We encourage them to go and have other experiences and be a member of other teams. We ask them to get another job and build their resume.  We want them to return to us as applicants who have had more experiences than we can offer. Most importantly, we want them to be emotionally and mentally prepared for those moments where they transition from participant to worker.

The Talk That Set Up Success

Like many camps that are hiring college-aged staff to work during the summer, over the past few years I have noticed an increase in staff that are being treated for (or have recently been treated for) anxiety. According to the American College Health Association (ACHA) the  2015 National College Health Assessment survey reported that nearly one in six college students (15.8 percent) had been diagnosed with, or treated for, anxiety.

Making Sense of MESH: Partnerships with Parents

As we tackle mental, emotional, and social health (MESH) issues in our programs, we must use every tool possible to help the struggling person. Sometimes, the most powerful tool can be the partnerships that we form with our parents. When strong, these partnerships can yield a support system where risks can be mitigated and the best interests of all can be advanced. However, at issue are the moments where these partnerships are weak or even nonexistent.

A Conversation with Katie — How One Camper Handles Mental Illness

The thing about mental, emotional and social health (MESH) is that you never know when, and you never know how, it is going to affect you or someone you love. You don’t know when your best friend or your neighbor may begin to struggle. Or finally tell you they have been for a long time. And you never know when that camper, that you would never admit was your favorite but of course was, will arrive back at camp for her 4th summer and doesn’t quite seem “the same”. But that is the thing about mental illness.

Camp: An Antidote to Stress?

At a recent gathering, a group of camp professionals were talking about stress. They mentioned how it seemed fairly pervasive among campers and staff, sometimes at debilitating levels. Then they said that for some youth, especially returning campers and staff, camp arrival triggered a huge sigh of relief and seemingly low stress levels. Exuberant comments like "I'm back!" and behaviors such as running pell-mell around camp provided solid testimony to their delight, a freeing of their spirit and a drop in their stress level. It took new people more time to experience that.

Want to Improve Your Response to Mental Health Challenges?

Camp professionals often ask what they might do to more effectively respond to staff and camper mental, emotional and social health (MESH) needs. This often arises from a desire to be as inclusive as possible while also recognizing that most camps are not therapeutic settings. The Healthy Camps III committee, a group of ACA and ACN professionals working to address that concern, offer the following ideas:

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