Resource Library

 

Editor's note: The following information is excerpted from Taking the High Road, A Guide to Effective and Legal Employment Practices for Nonprofits, published by the Nonprofit Risk Management Center. In these days when hiring discrimination has taken on a new meaning due to the September 11, 2001 tragedies in New York, Washington DC and Pennsylvania, this topic needs a fresh look.

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Picture the scene: A camp director makes a job offer to a counselor and receives a response of outrage that he has not been offered the job he wanted and, additionally, was not placed with his friends. The applicant has spent the previous eight summers as a camper and has now graduated through the system with certain expectations about what he prefers his job to be. Such is the epitome of the struggle in hiring former campers as staff members for the first time.

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I run two different camps for kids with different needs, including a resident camp for kids with autism. A concerned parent called to talk about how she wanted her son to be “mainstreamed” in the camp environment. By definition, there is no mainstreaming at my camp; they are all living with similar challenges.

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American Red Cross

As you hire your aquatics staff for this summer, there are both a few reminders as well as some changes occurring that are important for camp directors to know.

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The availability of international staff is made possible by a number of organizations that are formally designated as cultural exchange programs by the U.S. Department of State (Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs). Over the last several decades, the use of such staff has evolved from a value-added opportunity into a vital resource for many American summer camps. As this trend continues, we must take care not to lose sight of the cultural exchange aspect of these programs.

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In the camp world, we encounter many hurdles, challenges, and unique situations in our efforts to provide a quality camp experience for children. Some children present with physical limitations, others with psychosocial concerns, and many with unique requests for special accommodations. All of these children, however, present with parents. Parents have questions, concerns, and anxieties regarding the camp experience and how their child will be cared for in that environment (Ditter, 2009).

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Social skills and self-efficacy are fundamental processes and necessary for individuals in everyday life. Seeking employment, living independently, making friends, and trying new activities
all require social skills and self-efficacy. Empirical studies have found that outdoor residential camps improve these areas of development in children and youth because of the social encounters, new activities, independence, and leadership opportunities provided by enthusiastic and supportive staff (Thurber, Scanlin, Scheuler, and Henderson 2007).

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Dear Bob,

We are a coed resident camp operating in the mountains. It seems that every summer we have campers who aren’t really ready for the demands of group living in what is the intense social and physical environment that is our camp. We have found that some parents want to send their children because they believe we can help them make the friends they’ve never been able to make at home.

Without being too confrontational and scaring away what might otherwise be great campers, how do we determine whether a child is truly ready for the community living that is our camp?

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How do we increase the exposure of ACA-accredited camps to parents AND simultaneously educate parents on the value of being accredited?

ACA’s new approach to Find a Camp is the solution to this question. By allowing all camps to be listed on ACA’s Find a Camp — not just ACA-accredited camps — we open the door to more parents than ever and engage them in a conversation about the importance of accreditation.

Here are the stats:

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E.g., 2019-09-15