Resource Library

Marketing Matters: The Parent Perspective
Published Date: 2001-09-01

Marketing your camp often involves communicating with parents who are not experts at the selection process. In many cases, you are presenting your camp’s story to people who have never before made such a choice. For the purpose of this discussion, let’s call these people “neophytes,” defined as a novice or a beginner.

Read More

Challenging children are not out to get you — they are out to get their needs met. While there will be moments when it may seem precisely as if they are out to get you, more often than not, campers' challenging behavior serves a function, and understanding that function is instrumental in your efforts to deal with them effectively. What are those functions and needs? Research, common sense, and observations suggest some common answers: power, attention, security, and love.

Read More

The health center is a critical link in developing and maintaining a safe environment for your campers. However, providing adequate care to an active young population can be challenging. How should your health center be set up to best serve your campers? The following ideas will help you evaluate your health center and determine how you can provide adequate care while teaching campers personal responsibility.

Read More

"The resilient child is one who works well, plays well, loves well, and expects well."

Norman Garmezy

When we talk about youth, we too often use negative terms: what we would like them to stop doing. We want them to stop using drugs, stop drinking, stop dropping out of school, stop having sex, stop getting pregnant, stop being violent, and stop committing other delinquent acts. In short, we would like them to stop having problems - and stop being problems.

Read More
Teenagers and Sexuality at Camp
Published Date: 2000-09-01

As a psychiatrist who specializes in working with teens, I hear "it" discussed often - quietly, tentatively at first, until the teen decides that I am "OK." Usually the words are whispered until the teen feels more trusting . . . Does this doctor really want to hear what I have to say about this or is she going to give me a lecture? Can I ask her my questions or will she think I'm stupid? I bet she never had this problem. In fact, I bet no one has every had this problem, but maybe I could tell her it was some other kid, not me . . . never me.

Read More
Inclusive Outdoor Programs Benefit Youth
Published Date: 2000-07-01

Inclusion for persons with disabilities is rapidly occurring in all areas of living - school, work, and recreation. However, until recently, not much was known about inclusionary practices and their effects on participant outcomes in organized camp and outdoor school programs.

Read More

As the United States population becomes more diverse and camps employ more international staff, the issue of communicating and interacting effectively with people from other cultures becomes more important. Having respect for cultural differences and learning basic characteristics of other cultures can help you avoid misunderstandings and unintentionally offending others.

Read More

In this day when college students lobby for internships and field experience, the professional values of camp counseling seem to take a back seat. In truth, camp counseling is a position which fosters many professional skills, such as responsibility, patience, and flexibility. It is also a position in which one is responsible for children's lives — what could be more important than that?

Read More
  • Be the kind of person you want your campers to become - obey the rules yourself!
  • Know as many campers as possible by name. Know something about them. Build relationships.
  • Be friendly. Always show interest in what individual campers are doing and their progress.
  • "One pat on the back is worth two slaps in the face." Praise good qualities and actions.
  • A sense of humor is extremely valuable. Use it frequently.
  • Maintain your poise at all times. Don't let campers "get to you."
Read More

Many of your camp’s alumni may attempt to convince you that camp isn’t what it used to be and that so much has changed. They are right, of course. However, their point is that the camp program is no good because it just isn’t the same experience as fifty years ago. Being the talented visionary that you are, you delicately explain all the great things that are taking place at your camp, your higher retention rates, your fund-raising successes, and other indications of innovative and dynamic camp programming. It’s all to no avail; your alumni are still not convinced.

Read More

Pages

E.g., 2019-11-15
E.g., 2019-11-15