Resource Library

Begin with the End in Mind
Published Date: 2019-05-01

In his book The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, Stephen Covey describes Habit 2, “Begin with the End in Mind,” as a valuable approach to just about anything in life. For example, if you want to do a great job on a school project, first decide what the great finished project will look like. Then you can create the action plan for the steps you need to take to reach the project outcome you’ve envisioned.

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Building a Community: One Rock at a Time
Published Date: 2010-07-01

Imagine taking a prospective family on a tour of your wholesome, backto- nature camp. You lead them down a dirt path, over a log bridge, and along the lake's edge on a route that also includes a visit to a pink- and red-striped candy shop, a purple pizza joint, an ice cream parlor shaped like an ice cream cone, and a spherical video store . . . all on your camp grounds. Wholesome? Back-to-nature? Is that an airstrip over there? Such is the tour route when an inventive and inexpensive program activity is a hit with campers, staff, and visitors.

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This feature article is the first of an ongoing series of articles in Camping Magazine that will focus on inclusion, diversity, and cross-cultural agility to share in our individual communities and out in the world.

This past February, many of us were able to participate in a new educational track at our ACA National Conference in Albuquerque, New Mexico — Camp Includes Me. It was a phenomenal and timely experience as camp professionals from across the country, and the world, came together to focus on diversity, inclusion, and cross-cultural agility.

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Thirty-four years ago I came to camp for the first time as a member of the advisory/staff training team. I was a young mother, had finished graduate school a couple of years earlier, was a certified sex educator, and had been actively involved in sexuality education for about six years. The last time I had been in the camp setting, eight years previously, I had a very different perspective. I was single, had not yet finished my BSW, and had not yet developed my own clear conceptualizations of educational principles.

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I’ve been sorting through the piles of “stuff” on my desk. One of these was a stack of camp health ideas, incidents, and resources pertaining to topics that occasionally come up. These aren’t everyday matters; rather, they are situations that, when they occur, are definitely impactful. They typically receive limited planning consideration because they occur so infrequently. Perhaps it’s time to change that. With this in mind, read the following and address one or two topics with the appropriate people in your camp operation. Your effort now may result in better sleep when things happen.

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Calming Camper Conflicts
Published Date: 2019-05-01

Conflicts between kids at camp can arise for a wide variety of reasons — from being upset by relationships with peers or learning to adjust to new and different situations, to being frustrated with their progress in an activity or simply being tired, hot, or hungry — making campers restless, irritable, and/or inattentive. The list of what might trigger conflicts between campers is exhaustive — and can be exhausting!

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This article is part of Camping Magazine’s series on social justice, exploring social issues in the context of individual camps and the camp community as a whole as a way to spark further conversation and inspire positive change.
Contact Ann Gillard (anngillard@gmail.com) if you would like to participate or contribute to this series.

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Family Camp Impacts on Family Functioning
Published Date: 2012-01-01

Introduction

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We have all seen them — gaggles of teens walking together, each one looking at his or her own mobile phone screen; or couples out at dinner, one checking the e-mails on his Blackberry, the other checking posts and tweets on her iPhone. Screens have become ubiquitous in our society. According to a Pew technology study, 78 percent of children ages twelve to seventeen in the United States have a cell phone. They use it as a phone about one-third of the time (Rainie, 2012). Otherwise, they are texting, tweeting, checking their Instagrams, or taking and sending pictures.

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E.g., 2019-11-21