Resource Library

No Superheroes Need Apply

Does criminal behavior increase during difficult economic times? Some superheroes might say yes and some experts and researchers would agree.

What implications does this have for camps, both for-profit and nonprofit, and small businesses in general? Does this mean camp directors should be more vigilant during bad economic times? Is it time to post a job opening online for a superhero? No, wait! Look up in the sky! Here comes "Risk Management" to save the day!

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In the next five years, two out of every five new US campers five to 17 years old will be Hispanic. Because of their immigrant heritage and historical camper diversity challenges, many of them and their families will not be familiar with the summer camp experience.

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Kamaji Hats Off to Thee
Published Date: 2012-03-01

The camp lady of Chicago showed me photos of swank camps with luxurious cabins, electric tennis ball cannons, and soft-serve ice-cream machines. She talked up theatre and sports camps. She effused enthusiasm for all the currently “in” camps. No sale.

Finally she mentioned Camp Kamaji, Minnesota’s oldest camp for girls. Tight-lipped, she described ramshackle cabins. She admitted it was under new ownership, not yet accredited by ACA, and very, “and I mean very,” rustic. No electricity, no heat, and no toilets.

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The Invisible Link
Published Date:

Summer camp was initially established as a “back to nature” retreat for the children of wealthy New Englanders. It was a respite from the degradation of urban life. Over the years, with the help of myriad religious, educational, and social professionals, summer camps evolved into the blueprint for modern childhood. It became an evolving articulation of what our society deemed most beneficial for the growth and well-being of our children; a place where the values of self-reliance, respect, personal responsibility, fun, and camaraderie are instilled.

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Creating Community through Nature
Published Date: 2011-09-01

From a young age, author Joseph Cornell felt the awe and wonder of nature. For nearly forty years, Cornell has shared his passion for nature with the world, notably in the widely read and translated Sharing Nature with Children. His book inspired two more volumes of Sharing Nature activities: Sharing Nature with Children, Volume II and Listening to Nature, Volume III, and was recently updated for its twentieth anniversary.

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Moving about confidently, two cooks snatched the garlic bread from the oven, prepped the salad bar, whipped up chocolate pudding, and a meal was complete. As the new food service director at Camp Gilmont, I marveled at the vigorous activity around me in the camp kitchen. From the outside looking in, it appeared as if an intentional routine had been established, as if the employees’ activity was magically orchestrated. However, as I scrutinized the routine over the next few days, I realized that serious change needed to happen in this kitchen.

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A return to camp reminds our writer how it feels to be home.

A school teacher in Pinckney, Michigan, Jeff Miner had been a camp counselor or program director for just about every summer for the past fourteen years. But this summer was his last. He had plans on actually taking summers off, playing golf, and eating steak on his back patio. He was going into summer camp retirement.

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A Family Conference
Published Date: 2017-01-01

To be able to go to ACA's National Conference and feel so many people focused on the same goals that drive you, a group of people working toward a mission — it encourages so much growth. To be around so many driven people who say, "Yes, I care about education and our youth, and it starts with us," and to identify with this entire industry that is, simply put, a big family, is so rich and important. It is something not a lot of people my age, all of 22, have an opportunity to be a part of and feel. It is something I have trouble explaining, so bear with me.

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Recent events like Hurricane Sandy and the school shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary hit us hard. Across the country, we became consumed by news reports of these events and wondered how the lives of those affected would ever go on. The good news, if we can find any from these tragedies, is that people do fi nd a way to move on. However, life is more than dealing with tragedy — it is about facing challenges of all types, and learning how to deal with them builds resilience. Facing challenges successfully paves the way in our brain for new pathways as we face new challenges.

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